Turning Online Tutoring Into Cash

August 10, 2017

Teaching is an art, and online tutoring allows you to share that talent with more people than ever before, not to mention creating a stream of supplemental income to call your own.  It’s as simple as parlaying your expertise and knowledge into extra cash via the Internet.  Online tutoring is also safer and faster than offering your phone number on a flyer thumbtacked to the student union bulletin board.

We all have our strengths—mathematics, humanities, science, writing—that we can utilize to make additional money as a tutor. And while you are earning a second income, you are helping others who need it most. Even better, you can perform this type of job from the comforts of your own home or favorite coffee shop.

There are many avenues available offering an opportunity for you to earn money via online tutoring. The trick is to affiliate your talents with the proper organization, one that will treat you and your clients with the utmost respect.

Check the online reviews for the tutoring company you are interested in working with to spread your knowledge to others. Remember that people like to complain more than praise, so conduct a thorough search before moving on.  After you are satisfied with your choice, ask questions. How will I get work? How will I get paid? How will I know the service you are performing is on the up and up? It is up to you to perform your own due diligence—this is savvy advice whenever you decide to place your good name and reputation with any party.

Such due diligence will also give you the comfort of knowing your clients are not strangers or frauds answering online ads.  Legitimate online tutoring companies tend to attract those who are truly seeking help with a subject, as well as dedicated professionals offering to assist those students.

The implementation process is usually simple to get started as an online tutor. So go ahead, start your search, and be on your way to sharing your talents with the world and earn some extra cash along the way.

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Cool New Products at 2013 Builder’s Show

October 23, 2013

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 Two new innovative products showcased at the Southeast Builder’s Conference last month caused quite a stir.

 Encore Stone Products debuted its recycled granite pavers made from the granite waste created by countertop fabricators. Owner Brett Maugerihas found a way to turn that granite into 100% recycled granite pavers, interior tiles, and fire pits.

BRZ Brands displayed the BRZ Floor Guards, a product creating a specially-developed film covering for the bottom of your shoes that provides protection for carpet, tile, and hardwood floors. All you do is step into the “feet,” and you’re ready to go.

The BRZ Floor Guard is crafted from recycled plastic, features a recyclable film and has a low cost per use.


Peace on Earth

December 20, 2012

ImageTomorrow, if the world doesn’t come to end, I will celebrate yet another birthday.  It may be cliche, but what I will wish for when I blow out the candles is Peace on Earth.

There was a time when a puppy or G.I. Joe or even Glow-Globs were tops on my list, but those days are long gone.

The mindless killing of the children — and the adults charged with their care — in Newtown further magnifies that violence has become the backdrop for everyday life. This year alone,  there have been 16 mass shootings in the United States. Yes, 16, leaving 88 people dead.

Perhaps even more poignant, all of the children at Sandy Hook Elementary School — and for that matter, anyone born since 2001 — knows no other life than America at war.

I know there are no easy answers to the world’s strife. But at least for the next few days, may there be peace on earth and good will toward men.

Happy Holidays.


The Terra Firma…

February 17, 2012

The Terra Firma Institute: Eco-Friendly Values in Children

The exuberance of youth is alive and well inCentral Florida. And they have their sights set on how we educate our children.

By forming the Terra Firma Institute last June in Winter Park, a team of recent college graduates are laying the groundwork for something quite extraordinary: creating a generational change in the way we teach by returning to our roots and offering a better quality of education that emphasizes self-expression and instills eco-friendly values. This is far from a bunch of free-thinking antagonistic radicals — but they are out to change the world.

Founded by Clayton Ferrara of Winter Park, a 25-year-old 2009 Rollins College alumnus with degrees in Biology and Environmental Sciences, the Institute will accomplish its mission through a boutique eco-daycare, tutoring, and teaching others its methods. 

Ferrara chose the phrase Terra Firma — Latin for solid earth — since he believes education needs to do a better job at grounding us and concentrating more on the environment.  For example, he believes algebra could be taught by figuring out kilowatt hours or how much life a stream can manage.  The teachings will be conducted mainly through hands-on education in science, music and art.

“Science is what my degrees are in, but education is my real talent,” explainsFerrara. He decided to forego graduate school at MIT to be the Director of Education and Head Curator at the Oakland Nature Preserve in Central Florida. For two years, he honed his skills that would lead to launching the Institute.

To assure his vision comes to fruition,Ferraraturned to some of the finest young talent inCentral Florida.  Chris Castro, a 2010 graduate of the University of Central Florida (UCF) with a Bachelor’s in Environmental Science and a minor in Energy & Sustainability, is on board. The 23-year-old co-founded IDEAS (Intellectual Decisions on Environmental Awareness Solutions) as an undergraduate at UCF, a concept that has blossomed to 16 chapters at campuses nationwide. In December, he was honored for his work by President Barrack Obama at a White House holiday reception. He currently works forOrangeCountyas an energy specialist evaluating buildings for efficiency.

Castro explains that the work of Terra Firma and IDEAS is a perfect marriage, noting the IDEAS chapters make a great source of employees for the Institute when it opens.

“Terra Firma fills an incredible niche in the sustainability and environmental movements,” says Castro. “It will take generational shifts instilled in our current and younger generations.”

Lillie Wright ofWinter Park, who sits on the Institute’s Board of Directors, is offering guidance for the school’s evolving business plan. A 2010 Music Business graduate of FullSail University, Wright, 23, is working with Walker and Company building a sustainable elementary school inOrangeCounty.

“I see so much waste,” she says. “We have a chance to educate a younger generation to build things to last, not to be disposable.”

 Today Ferrara and his team are busy spreading the word about the Institute, writing grants, and raising funds to construct a building — green and sustainable, of course — to house the educational facility.

“We go under the banner of education,” he says, “but it’s really about finding yourself and being happy.”

For more information, contact hello@thinkterrafirma.org.

Reprinted from Central Florida Lifestyle, January 2012, by Kevin Fritz


Orlando’s Perfect Storm

November 29, 2011

Cap ratesOur economic problems at home keep us from seeing the value in our own market based on our own fears. But with the current prices, increasing rents, decreasing inventories, and a growing market, it appears to be the perfect storm for buying property in Orlando.  

Orlando is one of the key markets being targeted because of the availability of distressed properties, and because it has one of the highest cap rates in the country — 8.2% compared with a national average of 5.4%.  A cap rate is the rate of return on a particular investment — in this case, rental properties.  

In markets like Orlando that experienced high foreclosure rates, as well as price reductions of more than 50%, investing in rental housing has become the silver lining in the housing market today.


Have a (Cuban) Cigar, You’re Gonna Go Far

November 29, 2011

In the 1970s, Pink Floyd famously wrote “Have a Cigar” about making it in the world. Now the country known best for its cigars — Cuba — has given its citizens that same chance by allowing them to buy and sell homes at their discretion and to move at will. 

The National Association of Realtors leads the way in the United States to ensure Americans have the right to own, use, and transfer real property. The right to own your own home may seem innate to most Americans, so it is hard to imagine there are places in the world where the buying and selling of real estate is forbidden.

But thanks to reforms being undertaken by President Raul Castro, Cuba is no longer one of those places. A multiple listing-type website is reportedly already flooded with listings as Cubans find themselves with the freedom to buy and sell real estate for the first time since Fidel Castro took power in 1959.

The new law went into effect November 10, and there are limitations, such as two homes per owner and financing must go through Cuba’s Central Bank. Some worry the change could worsen class warfare and lead to a major homelessness problem as properties are bought out from under others, especially from money supplied by investors outside of Cuba.

For a more detailed look at the new Cuban law, read Cuba to Allow Buying and Selling of Property, With Few Restrictions by Victoria Burnett of the New York Times.


Writers Cringe, Kids Hate Reading?

August 18, 2011

Stealing a page from Sports Illustrated, here is a Sign of the Apocalypse: 443,963 Facebook users “like” a page called “I Hate Reading.” Moreover, 276,312 Facebook users “like” a “I Hate Books” page. In fact, there are dozens of Facebook pages devoted to the hatred of reading and books in general. Cross Over

A recent study by The Kaiser Family Foundation found children 8 to 18 read 38 minutes a day, down from 43 in a previous survey. That study related to magazines and newspapers.

Another study by the University of Maryland found that pleasure reading dropped 23 percent from 2003 to 2008 — 65 minutes a week to 50 minutes a week — with the greatest drop in ages 12 to 14.

Nonetheless, most experts agree that children are reading; they are just reading differently than we did: from their phones, computers, and iPads, for example. 

And with the popularity of Twilight, Harry Potter and The Hunger Games, it appears today’s kids are reading, even if they are telling the Facebook community otherwise.